Saturday, December 7, 2013

Howard Lamson

 

Ice cannot shiver in the cold,
Nor stones shrink from the lapping flame.
Eyes that are sealed, no more have tears;
Ears that are stopped hear nothing ill;
Hearts turned to silt are strange to pain;
Tongues that are dumb report no loss;
Hands stiffened, well may idle be;
no sigh is from a breathless breast.
.
Beauty may fade, but closed eyes see not;
Sorrow may wail, but stopped ears hear not;
Work is, but folded hands need work not;
Nothing to say is for dumb tongues.
The rolling earth rolls on and on
with trees and stones and winding streams-
My dream is what the hill-side dreams!



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Saturday, November 16, 2013

Oklahoma State University names Robert Sternberg as Provost

 
Wednesday, 21 April 2010 21:17
Robert Sternberg
Robert Sternberg
Oklahoma State University has selected Dr. Robert J. Sternberg of Tufts University as its new Provost and Senior Vice President. The action was approved by the OSU/A&M Board of Regents at its regular meeting on April 23.

Sternberg, who has served as dean of the Tufts School of Arts and Sciences since 2005, will officially assume the position on Aug. 1.
Sternberg discusses new position in Inside Higher Ed

“Bob Sternberg brings an outstanding record of creativity, scholarship and research to this position, and Oklahoma State University is extremely pleased to have him join our team to guide our academic programs,” said OSU President Burns Hargis.  “After visiting with deans and faculty, we knew his management style and leadership ability made him the right choice.”

Sternberg said, “I am thrilled about this wonderful opportunity.  OSU is on course to be among the top tier of state universities and land-grant systems in the country and it is an honor to join the OSU team.  I look forward to working with OSU’s outstanding faculty and helping OSU’s talented students succeed at the highest level.”

According to Hargis, OSU was fortunate to have four strong finalists with a unique array of experiences for the position, and all four visited the campus and met in forums with faculty and staff.

Dr. Marlene Strathe, who has held the OSU position since July 2003, announced last September that she planned to step down and return to the faculty. “We want to thank Marlene for her leadership and dedication to OSU as provost and as interim president,” said Hargis.

Sternberg will serve as the chief academic officer of the institution.  His responsibilities will include oversight of the colleges, including the Honors College and Library, as well as scholar development, academic services to students and assessment.

Prior to accepting his position at Tufts, he served in a variety of positions on the psychology faculty at Yale University from 1975, including acting chair and director of graduate studies.  He was the IBM Professor of Psychology and Education from 1986-2005, and director of the Center for the Psychology of Abilities, Competencies, and Expertise from 2000-2005.

He has served as an honorary psychology professor at the University of Heidelberg since 2007.

Sternberg received his B.A. degree summa cum laude from Yale University and his Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in psychology, and has been awarded 11 honorary doctorates from around the world.

He is serving as president of the International Association for Cognitive Education and Psychology, and is president-elect of the Federation of Associations of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.  In 2003 he was president of the American Psychological Association.  He currently serves on the board of directors of the International Association of Cognitive Education and Psychology, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and is an honorary trustee of the American Psychological Foundation.

He has been awarded numerous scholarly prizes and awards.  He has been on the ISI Highly Cited List in Psychology/Psychiatry since 2003, was listed as one of the “Top100 Psychologists of the 20th Century” by APA Monitor, and in 1984 Science Digest named him one of the 100 “Top Young Scientists in the U.S.”

Among the Fellowships he has received are a Fulbright Senior Specialist Fellow to Slovakia in 2005 and an IREX Visiting Scholar Fellow to Russia in 2000.

He also has been selected as a Fellow by 22 professional societies, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Educational Research Association, and the American Psychological Association.

 

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Alive by Justin Stone

 

The most visible creators I know of
are those artists whose medium
is life itself.
.
The ones who express
the inexpressible-
without brush, hammer, clay, or guitar.
They neither paint nor sculpt-
their medium is being.
.
what their pressure touches
has increased life.
They see but don't have to draw.
They are the artists of being
alive.
 
 
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Thursday, September 19, 2013

Enjoy Your Freedom



Go and catch a swimming fish,
Release it for freedom's sake,
Tell me what's behind your bitters wish,
Which orchards' leaves you would like to rake,
Allow me to hear mermaids singing,
Stay away from friends' envious stinging,
and have a clue
of what kind of blue
serves to keep your thoughts differ and true.
.
Come and pluck a twinkling star,
Pin it on your bedroom wall,
Tell me what your July daydreams are,
Sail on clouds that stand tall,
Halt winds that generate icy rain,
or jail limitless sins in your brain,
And be the first
to quench the thirst
on invading others' privacy, be my guest.






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Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Help Is Wanted to Stop the Fire Before It Hurts Residents at CA: The wildfire burning in and near Yosemite National Park in California


The wildfire burning in and near Yosemite National Park in California has charred 293 square miles, destroying at least 11 houses and endangering several mountain communities. Containment was estimated at 23 percent on Tuesday. The Rim Fire, as it is known, threatens several ancient sequoias, and the smoke has reached Carson City and Reno, more than 100 miles distant:

Washington Post image

Schoolchildren were kept inside for the second time in a week, people went to hospitals complaining of eye and throat irritation and officials urged people to avoid all physical activity outdoors.

“It’s five hours away,” said 22-year-old bartender Renee Dishman in disbelief after learning that the source of the haze was more than 150 miles away. “I can’t run. I can’t breathe. It makes me sneeze.” . . .

Everyone should avoid all physical activity outdoors when the air quality index reaches “hazardous,” considered “emergency conditions,” the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection said on its website. “People with heart or lung disease, older adults and children should remain indoors and keep activity levels low.”

Renown Regional Medical Center in Reno has experienced a “slight increase” in emergency room visits as a result of the smoke, said Jennifer Allen, the hospital’s clinical nursing supervisor.

“Patients are experiencing shortness of breath, eye and throat irritation, cough and headache due to the heavy smoke and poor air quality,” she said, adding that people with asthma and other respiratory ailments were most affected. Associated Press


Despite difficult terrain, firefighters are doing what they can to contain the flames:
The U.S. Forest Service said Tuesday that ground crews planned to work through the night to build containment lines on the northern flank of the fire. Communities north of the blaze, along the Highway 108 corridor from Tuolumne City to Pinecrest, also remained under evacuation orders.

Officials said crews on the southeast flank in Yosemite were planning to conduct extensive backfires, a dangerous tactic in which firefighters burn vegetation inside a fire line to help contain a rapidly spreading blaze.

Nearly 4,100 firefighters are taking part in the effort. . . .

While firefighters have used the Tuolumne River and granite formations on the fire’s northern edges to set up defenses, crews have found little to work with on the blaze’s eastern front south of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.

“They’re in scouting mode,” Dick Fleishman of the U.S. Forest Service said of fire crews. “There’s not a lot of real good areas to get out in there and do a lot of work.” Los Angeles Times


A number of factors have contributed to the unusual intesnity of the wildfire, one of the largest in California since record-keeping began in 1932:
Unnaturally long intervals between wildfires and years of drought primed the Sierra Nevada for the explosive conflagration chewing up the rugged landscape on the edge of Yosemite National Park, forestry experts say. . . .

Federal forest ecologists say that historic policies of fire suppression to protect Sierra timber interests left a century’s worth of fuel in the fire’s path.

“That’s called making the woodpile bigger,” said Hugh Safford, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service in California.

Two years of drought and a constant slow warming across the Sierra Nevada also worked to turn the Rim Fire into an inferno. For years forest ecologists have warned that Western wildfires will only get worse.

“Every year the summer temperatures are a little warmer, hence the conditions for burning are a little more auspicious,” said Safford. “People can deny it all they want but it’s happening. Every year the fuels are a little bit drier.”

The Rim Fire’s exponential growth slowed only after hitting areas that had burned in the past two decades, and Safford says that shows the utility of prescribed and natural burns that clear brush and allow wildfires to move rapidly without killing trees.


“If you look at the Sierra Nevada as a whole, by far the largest portion hasn’t seen a fire since the 1910s and 1920s, which is very unnatural,” said Safford, who has authored several papers on the increasing wildlife severity across California’s mountain ranges. “This one isn’t stopping for a while.”

Since a 1988 fire impacted nearly one third of Yellowstone National Park, forestry officials have begun rethinking suppression policies. Yosemite has adopted an aggressive plan of prescribed burns while allowing backcountry fires caused by lightning strikes to burn unimpeded as long as they don’t threaten park facilities.

“Yosemite is one of the biggest experimental landscapes for prescribed fire and it’s going to pay off,” Safford said. “The Rim Fire is starting to hit all those old fire scars.” Associated Press





check out the original post here:





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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Howard Lamson

 

Ice cannot shiver in the cold,
Nor stones shrink from the lapping flame.
Eyes that are sealed, no more have tears;
Ears that are stopped hear nothing ill;
Hearts turned to silt are strange to pain;
Tongues that are dumb report no loss;
Hands stiffened, well may idle be;
no sigh is from a breathless breast.
.
Beauty may fade, but closed eyes see not;
Sorrow may wail, but stopped ears hear not;
Work is, but folded hands need work not;
Nothing to say is for dumb tongues.
The rolling earth rolls on and on
with trees and stones and winding streams-
My dream is what the hill-side dreams!






Google.com

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Haiku Poem - Morning Mist by R H Y T H M U S [ Inside My Poem Book ]

 




Droplets, arced and fine  
Sweat kisses on thy forehead
Akin Morning mist


"A Sweat portrays Human Labor"
The dawn is so beautiful with dews on leaves and flowers and the same dew on humans are beautiful too just like the above Haiku

- haiku written for Haiku Heights





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Friday, July 5, 2013

The Top of My Hot Dog by Robert Pottle

 

(Sing to the tune of "On Top of Old Smoky") The top of my hot dog
is no longer bare.
It now has a topping
I didn’t want there.

I ordered my hot dog.
I ordered it plain,
without any toppings.
I ordered in vain.

Well, I started eating,
then looked up in the air,
A seagull flew toward me
and gave me a scare.

I covered my hot dog
a second too late.
What fell from that seagull’s
too gross to relate.

The top of my hot dog
is no longer bare.
It now has a topping
a seagull put there.




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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Britney Spears: She Is My Favorite Pop Singer!

Britney Spears,
her innocence and purity give all
thunder alike cheers,
her life has ups and downs,
but she refuses to die young,
people always remember her sweet voices,
and she is one of my favorite
pop singer choices,
she has grown strong,
she will enjoy life, and sail along.
I love her, she rocks.
 
 
 
 
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